Classroom Grant Examples

Elementary

Title of Lesson: Trout in the Classroom

Grade Level(s): K, 3, 4

STEM Area: Science

Standards Taught: 

Standard 4: Life Science. Students will gain an understanding of Life Science through the study of changes in organisms over time and the nature of living things.

Objective 1
Investigate living things.
Construct questions, give reasons, and share findings about all living things.
Compare and contrast young plants and animals with their parents.
Describe some changes in plants and animals that are so slow or so fast that they are hard to see (e.g., seasonal change, fast-blooming flower, slow growth, hatching egg).

Description of Lesson:

I am applying for this grant to fund our Trout in the Classroom project. During the course of this project (beginning in January and ending in May) we will receive trout eggs, watch them hatch and grow; taking care of them along the way. Our kindergarten room will house the fish but the 3rd and 4th grades will be coming in to observe the eggs and the fish.

As a kindergarten teacher I feel that what my students need most is an early and exciting exposure to the natural world. To help facilitate this we travel to the Ogden river weekly and observe our surroundings. A natural extension of this river observation would be Trout in the Classroom. We would be able to see, close up, on a daily basis, the trout that populate the river.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Eleanor, Kindergarten Teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: Energy Transfer

Grade Level(s): 1

STEM Area: Science

Standards Taught:

Description of Lesson:

  • SCHOOL WIDE ROOT Question: How does the structure and function of our school utilize energy transfer?
  • Performance Expectation: Students will carry out an iterative investigation to construct a model of how heat energy moves/transfers.
  • Episodes Class Activities/ Experiences Model Building Ideas or Questions Core Ideas Practices used Cross Cutting Concepts
    Episode #1;
    Exploration
    Introduce heat and talk about different sources of heat. Brainstorm as many sources of heat and write them on the butcher paper. Observe different places and items in the classroom and compare the heat of each place and item. Analyze why it is different. Where is the heat in our environment? Identify sources of heat. Asking Questions
  • Planning and carrying out investigations Energy and matter
    Episode #2:
    Exploration and Direct Instruction
    Students will measure temperature in various places outside and inside the school. They will be using a laser thermometer and other tools (thermometer, touch, sensors, etc.) to scan and record their findings on a school map. Emphasize using different tools for different environments-air, water, surface, etc. Model how to read the laser thermometer and other tools, and how to chart it on the school map. Let students explore with their tools and record information on their maps. How do we measure heat? Identify tools that measure heat. Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Analyzing and interpreting data Scale, proportion, and quantity
    Episode #3:
    Explore, Communicate,
    Observe, Experiment, and Reason/Analyze Take students outside. Have them draw x on the blacktop. Have students measure the temperature of the x. Now, have students shade the x with their own shadow. Have them measure the new temperature. Compare findings and discuss. Work in pairs to find an object that students would like to test to block the heat. Take students on a walk around the environment to identify materials that block heat. Compare the shade temperature to the temperature in the sun. Which is hotter? Why? T-chart: materials that block heat and do not block heat. Look at the shades in the classroom. Measure room temperature while the shades are blocking the sun, and while the shades are not. What kind of material would you use to block the heat? Brainstorm with partner and make a list of ordinary classroom objects that would block the heat. Which objects do you think would block the most heat? How do different materials block heat? Heat absorption Constructing explanations and designing solutions Patterns, Cause and effect
  • Episode #4:
    Exploring, observing, communicating, and predicting
    Have a class discussion about the fact that heat moves. What is the biggest source of heat in this area? Where can we go to see how things are heating up because of the sun? (direct the discussion to the playground). Identify 3 or 4 things that you are going to test the temp of outside. Make a P.O.O. chart-prediction, observation, outcome (t-chart with 3 columns). Go outside to the blacktop. Pair students and let them choose places (three places) to measure heat. Record their findings. Have students put an ice cube in each place. On the T-chart have students draw a before pic (ice at placement time) and after (ice after heat transfer). Gather as a class. Ask: What happened? Where did the heat go? Why did it happen? (the heat goes from the blacktop to the ice, etc.) How do different materials transfer heat? Heat transfer Planning and carrying out investigations, Engaging in argument from evidence Cause and effect, Energy and matter
  • Episode #5:
    Observation
    Take class on a tour of the classroom and building focusing on where heat comes through or out-venting, windows, lighting, etc. Scavenger hunt with map-how many sources of heat can you find? Color code according to source-window, vent, lighting. Class discussion on findings. Why is the vent on the wall close to the floor? How does heat move through the building? Heat transfer in human made structures Asking questions, Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information Structure and function
  • Episode #6:
    Direct instruction, communication, analyzing
    Show students a video of the components of the room and show them the diagram of the soccer field wells. Using basic terms, show them how heat is transferred to the air and through the vents. In the end, it costs nothing to heat and cool our school. Show the statistics on cost of heating other schools. Take the students out to the soccer field and do a walk and talk. with a partner, about what is beneath them. How does our school heat and cool the air differently than other schools? Conservation of heat Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information Structure and function, Energy and matter

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Joslyn, 1st grade teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: SOLE Science and Coding

Grade Level(s): 2

STEM Area: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math

Standards Taught:

  • Language Arts -Writing
    Standard 2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.
    Standard 5: With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
    Standard 7: Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • Language Arts – Speaking and Listening
    Standard 1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • Science
    Standard 1: The Processes of Science, Communication of Science, and the Nature of Science. Students will be able to apply scientific processes, communicate scientific ideas effectively, and understand the nature of science. (Focusing more on the Communication of Science and the Nature of Science)
  • Digital Literacy
    Standard 1: Demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers & applications, as well as an understanding of the concepts underlying hardware, software, and connectivity.
    Standard 3: Demonstrate the ability to use technology for research, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, communication, collaboration, creativity and innovation.
  • Mathematical Practices: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Description of Lesson:

My second graders and I practice the tenets of Nature of Science by working together in A Self-Organized Learning Environment, or SOLE, to understand that science knowledge helps us understand the world, investigations begin with a question, and our knowledge, or beliefs, can change when we learn new information. We also learn computer coding through Code.org. Coding not only develops engineering skills but also helps us develop strong mathematical practice skills since we have to make sense of problems and persevere to solve the issue.

A SOLE can exist anywhere there is a computer, Internet connection, and students who are ready to learn. Students are given the freedom to learn collaboratively using the internet while I pose a Big Question and facilitate the environment so that students can form groups to find answers. Likewise, coding needs internet access on mobile devices or stationary computers so that students can work individually or in pairs to develop coding skills and advance to designing basic programs.

I love the fact that SOLE sessions allow the students to move freely and share information or to change groups at any time; towards the end of a session, they design posters that show their answer with supporting evidence they have collected to my big question and then present it to the class. SOLE sessions are characterized by discovery, sharing, spontaneity and limited teacher intervention. The students learn so much more about the concept through a SOLE than they would if I presented ideas to them. Coding allows students to problem solve increasingly difficult challenges through trial and error, student-lead discussions of possible solutions, and working together to understand the next level of skills needed to be successful coders. This is not a one-to-one device plan. The structure of SOLE and Coding exercises is set-up to build communication skills in written and oral language.

My second graders are smart, capable individuals who are learning how technology helps us understand the world and express their own ideas. Unfortunately, my classroom and the school does not have enough computers or easy access to mobile devices for the lower grades. I need 5 Chromebooks to use in the classroom so that this year’s students, and my future students, can become great learners and thoughtful leaders in our community by practicing Nature of Science tenets and Engineering Design Processes on a daily basis through Chromebooks.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Taunya, 2nd grade teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: Sumblox in Action

Grade Level(s): K-5

STEM Area: Math

Standards Taught: 

  • This project links to all Utah Core Standards Kindergarten through Fifth Grade that earmark a focus on the following Domains within each grade level:
    Kindergarten: Counting and Cardinality; Operations and Algebraic Thinking
    First: Operations and Algebraic Thinking: Numbers and Operations in Base Ten
    Second: Operations and Algebraic Thinking; Number and Operations in Base Ten; Fractions
    Third: Operations and Algebraic Thinking; Number and Operations in Base Ten; Fractions
    Fourth: Operations and Algebraic Thinking; Number and Operations in Base Ten; Fractions
    Fifth: Operations and Algebraic Thinking; Number and Operations in Base Ten; Fractions

Description of Lesson:

I was privileged to attend some excellent math workshops this summer at USU and at one of the sessions we were introduced to the Sumblox math manipulative system.  We were fascinated by its ability to be used for hands on manipulation and learning of not only addition and subtraction facts, but multiplication, division and even fractions!  This ingenious system can help students at all levels in our school from kindergarten to fifth grade.  I am a second grade teacher and would house the kits I am requesting in my classroom, but would also train the staff on how to use them effectively and create a checkout system with the kits for all grade levels to have access to them.

I think this is exploratory learning, great fact play/practice, fun and engagement in math facts.  I believe we could touch every child in our school in some way, from simple number sense in kindergarten to addition/subtraction in 1st-2nd grade, multiplication and division in 3-5th grades.  Many topics like adding three addends, or repeated addition as multiplication can be visually as well as physically seen while “exploring” with the sumblox.

The Sumblox are much larger than any of the math manipulatives that I have ever used.  The ingenious way they work together to help students solve math problems in visually and physically concrete ways would help our struggling students succeed while also providing an opportunity for our excelling students to “solve the puzzles” in a way depending on how they are used.  I love that they can be used as a tool for remediation as well as stimulation for our higher level thinkers!

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Rachelle

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: EV3’s and Coding

Grade Level(s): 6

STEM Area: Technology, Engineering, Math

Standards Taught:

  • Math
    6.RP.A Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
    6.NS.C Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.
    6.EE.A Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
    6.EE.B Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
    6.EE.C Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
    6.SP.A Develop understanding of statistical variability.
  • ELA
    Reading: Informational Text Standard 4
    Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
    Reading: Informational Text Standard 7
    Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
    Reading: Informational Text Standard 10
    By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6_8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
    Writing Standard 2
    Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
    Writing Standard 4
    Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1_3 above.)
    Writing Standard 7
    Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
    Writing Standard 9
    Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    Writing Standard 10
    Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
    Speaking and Listening Standard 1
    Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others_ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    Speaking and Listening Standard 2
    Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.
    Speaking and Listening Standard 4
    Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
    Speaking and Listening Standard 5
    Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.
    Language Standard 6
    Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
  • Engineering
    MS-ETS1-1.
    Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
    MS-ETS1-2.
    Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
    MS-ETS1-3.
    Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
    MS-ETS1-4.
    Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

Description of Lesson:

Once a week students will participate in “Technology Tuesday”.  During this time, students will learn about the engineering design process and will participate in a middle school version of the Agile Programming Process while programming Ev3s.  Students will be given weekly challenges which require them to solve problems, design code, write pseudocode, write programs using Ev3 software, take part in software testing, and contribute to the iterative process of software programming and robotics engineering.

Through the K-6 STEM Endorsement program, I am learning about the nature of science and engineering.  Students need to learn science and engineering process skills.  Software engineering and robotics engineering are a great way to do this, because of the immediate feedback that it provides.  As one of the teachers on the new science core writing committee, I am also aware that engineering design problems have been incorporated into the new 6th grade science standards.  Students need projects that put _the E back in STEM_ѝ.  This project incorporates English Language Arts and Math to show students the use of real-world engineering in school.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Karre, 6th grade teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson:

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STEM Area:

Standards Taught:

Description of Lesson:

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov


Middle

Title of Lesson: 2D/3D House Plans and Market Research

Grade Level(s): 7, 8

STEM Area: Technology, Engineering, Math

Standards Taught:

  • Use surface area and perimeter to meet project requirements (8.G.4)
  • Determine area of composite figures (7.G.4, 7.G.6)
  • Apply changes in dimensions (8.G.9)
  • Use unit rates (Use 7.RP.2, 7.RP.3)
  • Understand scale factor to create and interpret scale drawings (7.G.1)
  • Apply properties of similar polygons (8.G.4)
  • Use a sample population to make a conjecture regarding appropriate market value of the home using scatterplots (8.SP.1, 7.SP.1, 7.SP.2)
  • Working with mixed numbers (7.NS.1, 7.NS.3, 7.EE.3)

Description of Lesson: 

Students will use android applications to create a two-dimensional digital floor plan of a home that meets specified requirements regarding functionality, square footage, perimeter, and lot size. They will then convert the dimensions using scale factor and create a three-dimensional scaled model of their plan.

Students will do market research on local home pricing and using a graphing calculator application create a scatterplot and regression line of comparable data to make a conjecture regarding the price of their home.

Students will keep a record of their progress using notepad, camera and voice recorder applications. They will then present their project in a simulated business setting.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Dena, Middle School Math Teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: Asexual Reproduction

Grade Level(s): 7

STEM Area: Science

Standards Taught:

This project addresses the following USOE 7th Grade Integrated Science Core Standards and objectives.

  • 7.4.1 Reproduction and Genetics
    Objective 1: Compare how sexual and asexual reproduction passes genetic information from parent to offspring.
    c. Cite examples of organisms that reproduce … asexually (e.g., hydra, planaria, bacteria, …).
    d. Compare inherited structural traits of offspring and their parents.
  • 7.4.2 Adaptations and Evolution
    Objective 2: Relate the adaptability of organisms in an environment to their inherited traits and structures.
    a. Predict why certain traits (e.g., structure of teeth, body structure, coloration) are more likely to offer an advantage for survival of an organism.
    b. Cite examples of traits that provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not other environments.
    d. Relate the structure of organs to an organism_s ability to survive in a specific environment.

Description of Lesson:

The goal of this project is to help students achieve and demonstrate mastery of the core objectives relating to asexual reproduction, inherited traits, and adaptations for survival by providing them with the opportunity to experiment and acquire empirical evidence in the laboratory.  This will enhance, supplement, and reinforce evidence they acquire from text and video sources.  Working with the live specimens and cultures will help students acquire knowledge of many structural adaptations which are not apparent without the use of a microscope.  Obtaining the bacterial specimens from locations around the school will help them to gain understanding of how different organisms have adapted to various  environments.  All of these organisms will help students to observe asexual reproductive strategies which would not be observable without the use of the microscopes.

Students will prepare living specimens of hydra which will provide them with empirical evidence of budding, an asexual reproductive strategy.  Students will use the microscope station to make periodic observations of their hydra cultures. Students will utilize the daphnia as a food source for the hydra.  Students will prepare specimens of planaria to observe their reproductive strategies and structural adaptations.  Students will maintain the specimens by feeding them liver.  Students will prepare cultures of bacteria from classroom objects and school locations and make regular observations, using the microscope, which will give them empirical evidence of the rapidity of binary fission as a reproductive strategy.  Normally I facilitate student learning of these objectives using a variety of text and web based resources, especially those found on learn.genetics.utah.edu.  This project will give students the opportunity to observe structural traits and asexual reproductive processes in live specimens, engaging them directly with their subject matter and giving them the opportunity to see variability that is seldom evident in video or photo references.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Ryan, 7th grade Science teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

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Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

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Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

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Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov


High School

Title of Lesson: Robotics

Grade Level(s): 9-12

STEM Area: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math

Standards Taught:

Robotics is a great way to achieve what the USOE’s Core Standards document describes as “The Most Important Goal”. That document describes this goal as, “Science instruction should cultivate and build on students_ curiosity and sense of wonder. Effective science instruction engages students in enjoyable learning experiences.” The work that I’ve done so far with students building robots has shown me how wonderfully effective robotics can be for meeting the goals just mentioned.

As for specific Core Standards:
– From the Physics Core Curriculum, students will learn about motion (Std #1), forces (Std #2), electricity (Std #3), and energy (Std #4).
– From the Math Core Curriculum, students will learn to “Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them” (Proficiency #1), “Reason abstractly and quantitatively” (Proficiency #2), Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others (Proficiency #3), “Model with mathematics” (Proficiency #4), “Use appropriate tools strategically”(Proficiency #5), and “Attend to precision” (Proficiency #6).

Description of Lesson:

Our school started a new robotics class this year but due to funding constraints the class is rather short on supplies.  Students have to work in much larger teams than is ideal.  I propose to purchase an additional set of equipment so that we can make the team sizes smaller which will let students get more hands-on time using the equipment.

Robotics ties together physics, math, engineering, and programming.  Students get to see why it’s important for them to study all of those classes. Through robotics students get hands-on experience that teaches them how to correctly calculate things like electrical power requirements, to estimate forces and ranges of mechanical motion, and to write program code correctly.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: Douglas

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson: Chemistry of Life

Grade Level(s): 9-10

STEM Area: Science

Standards Taught:

  • Standard 1, Obj 1-3 Studying interactions between organisms and ecosystems
  • Standard 2, Obj 2. Studying the flow of energy and matter in cellular function

Description of Lesson:

Normally, in looking at cell respiration and photosynthesis we discuss what plants are doing in relation to simply looking at pea plants that we have grown from seed for another unit.
Normally, in looking at cycles of matter in ecosystems, we create terrariums and the students draw what is going on with the cycles (carbon, water, nitrogen) on paper by relating it to what they have created.
Normally, in looking at photosynthesis we also watch for the production of carbon dioxide gas from an organism in water as the solution turns blue, as well as watch for the production of oxygen gas bubbles.
However, the Vernier equipment will allow the students to see actual levels of these gases produced and shown on their amounts charted on x-y graphs in real time. It allows for discussion of actual numbers, and also helps the students see specific real-life interactions in real-time with interpretation of the charts and graphs being produced.
This equipment will bring learning to higher level, and will allow the students to see immediate responses that are generated within a system when variables are changed.

Basically, modelling and response in the science classroom is brought to life.

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

  • Project Description: We purchased the following probes: carbon dioxide, oxygen, ethanol, temperature, and pH. We also purchased a data logger to use upload the probe data to a laptop, and experiment containers to attach the probes to in order to collect data from monitored specimens. We had enough to allow teacher demonstrations of cellular respiration and photosynthesis of plants, plant seeds, yeast, and crickets. Students were asked to make predictions of what they thought the graphs would look like over a period of 2 minutes, prior to data collection. Students were then asked to compare their predictions with actual data/results and discuss differences and surprises that were observed. The pH meter and temperature meter has not been used yet. It is intended for use with Unit 2 – cell biochemistry, which is taught at the beginning of the school year.
  • What worked? The probes are very easy to use. And the data is clear and real time on the computer screen, so it is readily available. The comparisons between predictions and observed results worked really well, especially when students expectations were not entirely accurate — as was seed with the pea seeds that had been brought out of dormancy after exposure to water — cell respiration was the dominant process. The students also were surprised to see a plant switch from a dominant process of photosynthesis to cellular respiration after being “damaged” — (leaves cramped down a lot or stems broken), so that cellular repair was initiated.
  • What Didn’t Work? Direct student engagement is the best scenario for student learning. Thus, since this was a task that the students were watching the teacher demonstrate, some kids lost interest at times. Students had to be reminded to stay on task and think about the new demonstration that was about to be shown. As such, we were able to secure another grant to purchase a classroom set of these probes so that students can do these experiments themselves next year in groups of 4. Only 1 teacher knows how to use and demonstrate the ethanol probe experiment, so we need to set up a learning day to go through that, so that it can be used by all teachers next year. However, our goal is to get it used during the review for end of level testing, if time allows this year.
  • What Would You Change? Get students actively involved. Have them suggest different scenarios to experiment with prior to the demo day or lab day. Have them make predictions before the experiment is run. Don’t underestimate the time it takes to set up the experiments. Also, the probes are sensitive, so it takes some practice to be able to explain that bumping them causes a jump in data. Also, keeping the plants and seeds in the dark prior to the demonstration seems to get the best/consistent results. Next year we will have the students save the graphs to their computers that are generated from their experiments and then upload them to CANVAS to discuss in greater detail.
  • Would you do this activity again, or recommend it to another teacher? Yes

Lesson Created by: Shaunda, high school Biology teacher

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson:

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Description of Lesson:

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov

Title of Lesson:

Grade Level(s):

STEM Area:

Standards Taught:

Description of Lesson:

Feedback from Applicant after implementation:

Lesson Created by: (picture and bio)

For more information, contact Kellie Yates at kellieyates@utah.gov